Health Department Services

Communicable Disease Control

Influenza (flu) is a contagious disease that can be very serious.

fight the flu


It’ not too late!

Does your child still need protection against the flu?

Did you miss the Flu clinic?

At this time, the Greendale Health Department can offer children 6 months of age to 18 years old the flu vaccine FREE!

As part of our flu clinic, the Greendale Health Department will continue to offer the flu vaccine FREE until November 22nd.   (While supplies last.)

After November 22, 2017, federal regulations only allow us to offer free vaccine to children on Medicaid or Badgercare, or if the child is uninsured or underinsured, or American Indian or Alaskan Native.

                                              Call for an appointment 414-423-2110


1.   
Get yourself and your family vaccinated!

A yearly flu vaccine is the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. Everyone 6 months or older should get an annual flu vaccine by the end of October, if possible, or as soon as possible after October.

Flu vaccines are offered in many locations, including doctor’s offices, clinics, health departments, pharmacies and college health centers, as well as by many employers, and even in some schools.
                                                        
2.      Take everyday precautions to help stop the spread of flu germs!

Avoid close contact with sick people, avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, cover your coughs and sneezes, wash your hands often (with soap and water), and clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with flu viruses.

If you become sick, limit contact with others as much as possible. Remember to cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and throw tissues in the trash after you use them.

3.     Take Antiviral Drugs if your Doctor Prescribes them!

If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can be used to treat flu illness. Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They also can prevent serious flu complications, like pneumonia.


The Greendale Health Department is holding their annual community flu clinic on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 3:30 pm to 7:00 pm, at the Greendale High School.   The flu shot is free for children, 18 years and younger and $30 for adults.  Call the Health Department at 414-423-2110 with any questions. 

 

Source:  https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm




Communicable Disease & Reportable Conditions
 

Wisconsin State Law requires the reporting of communicable diseases to the local Health Department. Report notifiable conditions to 414-423-2110.  Communicable disease can be reported by individuals, laboratories, or health care professionals. The law requires that public health nurses provide surveillance and investigation to prevent and control the spread of disease. Requirements for the timing of reporting, once the disease or condition is recognized or suspected, vary by disease. General reporting requirements are described in Wisconsin Statute Chapter 252, Communicable Diseases. The specific reporting requirements are described in Chapter DHS 145, Control of Communicable Diseases. A list of reportable conditions is provided in Chapter DHS 145 - Appendix A.

Some reportable diseases include: hepatitis, meningitis, pertussis (whooping cough), Lyme disease, tuberculosis, food and waterborne outbreaks, and sexually transmitted infections.  A Public Health Nurse will contact the individual, family and contacts to provide them with information and counseling about the disease. Public Health Nurses are available to answer questions that residents may have regarding a communicable disease. Fact sheets and pamphlets with information on specific diseases are also available on request.

The prevalence of communicable disease depends upon many environmental factors. For information on a specific communicable disease, please visit one of the following reputable websites: 

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (www.cdc.gov) 

Wisconsin Department of Health Services (www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/communicable)